International Consortium of Vascular Registries Consensus Recommendations for Peripheral Revascularisation Registry Data Collection

Objective/Background

To achieve consensus on the minimum core data set for evaluation of peripheral arterial revascularisation outcomes and enable collaboration among international registries.

Methods

A modified Delphi approach was used to achieve consensus among international vascular surgeons and registry members of the International Consortium of Vascular Registries (ICVR). Variables, including definitions, from registries covering open and endovascular surgery, representing 14 countries in ICVR, were collected and analysed to define a minimum core data set and to develop an optimum data set for registries. Up to three different levels of variable specification were suggested to allow inclusion of registries with simpler versus more complex data capture, while still allowing for data aggregation based on harmonised core definitions.

Results

Among 31 invited experts, 25 completed five Delphi rounds via internet exchange and face to face discussions. In total, 187 different items from the various registry data forms were identified for potential inclusion in the recommended data set. Ultimately, 79 items were recommended for inclusion in minimum core data sets, including 65 items in the level 1 data set, and an additional 14 items in the more specific level 2 and 3 recommended data sets. Data elements were broadly divided into (i) patient characteristics; (ii) comorbidities; (iii) current medications; (iv) lesion treated; (v) procedure; (vi) bypass; (vii) endarterectomy (viii) catheter based intervention; (ix) complications; and (x) follow up.

Conclusion

A modified Delphi study allowed 25 international vascular registry experts to achieve a consensus recommendation for a minimum core data set and an optimum data set for peripheral arterial revascularisation registries. Continued global harmonisation of registry infrastructure and definition of items will overcome limitations related to single country investigations and enhance the development of real world evidence.

Link: https://www.ejves.com/article/S1078-5884(18)30213-2/fulltext

International Consortium of Vascular Registries

The International Consortium of Vascular Registries (ICVR) has rapidly developed into a global collaborative. Given the importance of vascular devices for public health, this is a priority direction for regulators, manufacturers, payers and patients advocacy groups. It is an innovative effort building on successes achieved in orthopedics and promotes cohesion among international registries. The ICVR will enable a collaboration of stakeholders to create a sustainable global system to evaluate the safety and efficacy of new and existing vascular devices and procedures, while promoting innovation and quality improvement.

Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00772-018-0475-8

Assessment of International Outcomes of Intact Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair over 9 Years

BACKGROUND:

Case mix and outcomes of complex surgical procedures vary over time and between regions. This study analyses peri-operative mortality after intact abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in 11 countries over 9 years.

METHODS:

Data on primary AAA repair from vascular surgery registries in 11 countries for the years 2005-2009 and 2010-2013 were analysed. Multivariate adjusted logistic regression analyses were carried out to adjust for variations in case mix.

RESULTS:

A total of 83,253 patients were included. Over the two periods, the proportion of patients ≥80 years old increased (18.5% vs. 23.1%; p < .0001) as did the proportion of endovascular repair (EVAR) (44.3% vs. 60.6; p < .0001). In the latter period, 25.8% of AAAs were less than 5.5 cm. The mean annual volume of open repairs per centre decreased from 12.9 to 10.6 between the two periods (p < .0001), and it increased for EVAR from 10.0 to 17.1 (p < .0001). Overall, peri-operative mortality fell from 3.0% to 2.4% (p < .0001). Mortality for EVAR decreased from 1.5% to 1.1% (p < .0001), but the outcome worsened for open repair from 3.9% to 4.4% (p = .008). The peri-operative risk was greater for octogenarians (overall, 3.6% vs. 2.1%, p < .0001; open, 9.5% vs. 3.6%, p < .0001; EVAR, 1.8% vs. 0.7%, p < .0001), and women (overall, 3.8% vs. 2.2%, p < .0001; open, 6.0% vs. 4.0%, p < .0001; EVAR, 1.9% vs. 0.9%, p < .0001). Peri-operative mortality after repair of AAAs <5.5 cm was 4.4% with open repair and 1.0% with EVAR, p < .0001.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this large international cohort, total peri-operative mortality continues to fall for the treatment of intact AAAs. The number of EVAR procedures now exceeds open procedures. Mortality after EVAR has decreased, but mortality for open operations has increased. The peri-operative mortality for small AAA treatment, particularly open surgical repair, is still considerable and should be weighed against the risk of rupture.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28416191

Editor’s Choice – Carotid Stenosis Treatment: Variation in International Practice Patterns

OBJECTIVES:

The aim was to determine current practice for the treatment of carotid stenosis among 12 countries participating in the International Consortium of Vascular Registries (ICVR).

METHODS:

Data from the United States Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) and the Vascunet registry collaboration (including 10 registries in Europe and Australasia) were used. Variation in treatment modality of asymptomatic versus symptomatic patients was analysed between countries and among centres within each country.

RESULTS:

Among 58,607 procedures, octogenarians represented 18% of all patients, ranging from 8% (Hungary) to 22% (New Zealand and Australia). Women represented 36%, ranging from 29% (Switzerland) to 40% (USA). The proportion of carotid artery stenting (CAS) among asymptomatic patients ranged from 0% (Finland) to 26% (Sweden) and among symptomatic patients from 0% (Denmark) to 19% (USA). Variation among centres within countries for CAS was highest in the United States and Australia (from 0% to 80%). The overall proportion of asymptomatic patients was 48%, but varied from 0% (Denmark) to 73% (Italy). There was also substantial centre level variation within each country in the proportion of asymptomatic patients, most pronounced in Australia (0-72%), Hungary (5-55%), and the United States (0-100%). Countries with fee for service reimbursement had higher rates of treatment in asymptomatic patients than countries with population based reimbursement (OR 5.8, 95% CI 4.4-7.7).

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite evidence about treatment options for carotid artery disease, the proportion of asymptomatic patients, treatment modality, and the proportion of women and octogenarians vary considerably among and within countries. There was a significant association of treating more asymptomatic patients in countries with fee for service reimbursement. The findings reflect the inconsistency of the existing guidelines and a need for cooperation among guideline committees all over the world.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28274551

Variations in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Care: A Report From the International Consortium of Vascular Registries

BACKGROUND:

This project by the ICVR (International Consortium of Vascular Registries), a collaboration of 11 vascular surgical quality registries, was designed to evaluate international variation in the contemporary management of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with relation to recommended treatment guidelines from the Society for Vascular Surgery and the European Society for Vascular Surgery.

METHODS:

Registry data for open and endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) during 2010 to 2013 were collected from 11 countries. Variations in patient selection and treatment were compared across countries and across centers within countries.

RESULTS:

Among 51 153 patients, 86% were treated for intact AAA (iAAA) and 14% for ruptured AAA. Women constituted 18% of the entire cohort (range, 12% in Switzerland-21% in the United States; P<0.01). Intact AAAs were repaired at diameters smaller than recommended by guidelines in 31% of men (<5.5 cm; range, 6% in Iceland-41% in Germany; P<0.01) and 12% of women with iAAA (<5 cm; range, 0% in Iceland-16% in the United States; P<0.01). Overall, use of EVAR for iAAA varied from 28% in Hungary to 79% in the United States (P<0.01) and for ruptured AAA from 5% in Denmark to 52% in the United States (P<0.01). In addition to the between-country variations, significant variations were present between centers in each country in terms of EVAR use and rate of small AAA repair. Countries that more frequently treated small AAAs tended to use EVAR more frequently (trend: correlation coefficient, 0.51; P=0.14). Octogenarians made up 23% of all patients, ranging from 12% in Hungary to 29% in Australia (P<0.01). In countries with a fee-for-service reimbursement system (Australia, Germany, Switzerland, and the United States), the proportions of small AAA (33%) and octogenarians undergoing iAAA repair (25%) were higher compared with countries with a population-based reimbursement model (small AAA repair, 16%; octogenarians, 18%; P<0.01). In general, center-level variation within countries in the management of AAA was as important as variation between countries.

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite homogeneous guidelines from professional societies, significant variation exists in the management of AAA, most notably for iAAA diameter at repair, use of EVAR, and the treatment of elderly patients. ICVR provides an opportunity to study treatment variation across countries and to encourage optimal practice by sharing these results.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27784712